Health Articles

 

Alcohol may be less harmful for people over 50

A Recent Study Examines The Health Impact Of Consuming Alcohol At Different Ages. The Authors Conclude That, For People Over The Age Of 50, The Health Risks May Be Less Severe.

Heavy Drinking Is Linked To A Range Of Serious health Consequences.

These include certain cancers, Liver And heart Disease, And Damage To The Nervous System, Including The Brain.

However, As Has Been Exhaustively Covered In The Popular Press, Drinking In Moderation Might Have Certain Health Benefits.

A Number Of Studies Have Concluded That Drinking Alcohol At A Low Level Could Have A Protective Effect.

Detecting dementia early

Today, Alzheimer's disease — the most common form of dementia — is one of the leading causesof death in the United States. As the population's average age slowly rises, the number of deaths due to dementia are likely to rise in line.

Despite this, catching dementia early remains challenging. Oxford Brain Diagnostics believe that their technology can catch the condition years before symptoms become apparent.

Their secret lies in cortical disarray measurement (CDM). In short, this technique enables scientists to gather an "extra level of detail" from existing MRI scans. This allows them to detect changes in the microanatomy of the brain.

Dr. Steven Chance — Oxford Brain Diagnostics' CEO — told MNT that "CDM extracts information about the microscopic structure of the brain's gray matter by applying a unique analysis to a standard form of MRI scan."

"The method reveals the damage to the cerebral cortex even in the early stages of disease because it is sensitive to disruption at the cellular scale."

Dr. Steven Chance

Alongside the obvious benefits of spotting the signs of dementia earlier, the technology might also assist the pharmaceutical industry: Researchers could quantify how experimental drugs affect the microstructure of the brain.

5-minute breathing 'workout' may benefit heart and brain health

Preliminary research reveals that a technique called Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training can boost cognitive and physical performance, as well as cardiovascular health.

 

Most of us know that exercising and eating right are good for us.

However, putting in the effort to do so can often require more willpower than we have.

What if there was a way to reap all the benefits of a workout without having to lift a finger?

New research introduces a 5-minute technique that might improve blood pressure, lower heart attack risk, boost cognitive ability, and enhance sports performance — all while barely having to move.

The technique is called Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training (IMST), and researchers led by Daniel Craighead — a postdoctoral researcher in the University of Colorado Boulder's Department of Integrative PhysiologyMost of us know that exercising and eating right are good for us.

However, putting in the effort to do so can often require more willpower than we have.

What if there was a way to reap all the benefits of a workout without having to lift a finger?

New research introduces a 5-minute technique that might improve blood pressure, lower heart attack risk, boost cognitive ability, and enhance sports performance — all while barely having to move.

The technique is called Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training (IMST), and researchers led by Daniel Craighead — a postdoctoral researcher in the University of Colorado Boulder's Department of Integrative Physiology